What Does COVID-19 Mean for Your Taxes?

By now, I’m sure, you’ve heard that the federal government has postponed the deadline for filing your 2019 tax return and paying any tax owed, moving it from April 15 to July 15. This gave me and my team, as I’m sure it did you, a huge sense of relief as we all grapple with the more pressing crisis we all face: COVID-19 and the havoc it continues to wreak on our nation. Your top priority should be keeping yourself and your family safe and healthy.

Rest assured that you don’t have to do anything — no filing of any extension paperwork — in order to take advantage of this new deadline.

Note that this also new deadline also applies to the first installment of estimated tax payments for the first quarter of 2020 — that payment deadline has also been moved from April 15 to July 15.

However, you may be wondering about COVID-19’s impact on certain other deadlines and business or tax-related transactions, particularly at the state level. Here’s some important information for you to be aware of:

No change to Q2 federal estimated tax payment deadline: While the Q1 deadline has been pushed to July, what you may not realize is that at the time of this writing, the June 15 deadline for sending Q2 estimated tax payments has NOT yet changed. You should still plan to submit this estimated payment in June, with the Q1 payment due a month later.

Change to IRA and HSA contributions: There has been an adjustment to the April 15 deadline for making contributions to Traditional and Roth IRAs or Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) for 2019. If you plan to make contributions that count toward 2019, you must do this by July 15.

Depending on the state where you live and do business, you’ll need to take the following state-level information into account as well:

If you do business in Nevada… you file no state income tax, but take note that the Department of Taxation in the state is fully closed due to COVID-19. Taxpayers are advised to file and pay their taxes (this primarily applies to sales tax) through its online portal or by mail. Business license renewals have undergone no COVID-19-related changes; you should plan to renew through the Nevada Secretary of State’s online business portal, SilverFlume.

If you do business in California… you should know that the Franchise Tax Board (FTB) has postponed the filing and payment deadlines for all individuals and business entities to July 15. This applies to the following:

  • 2019 tax returns
  • 2019 tax return payments
  • 2020 Q1 and Q2 estimated payments (*Note: Remember, the federal Q2 deadline of June 15 is still in place as of today).
  • 2020 LLC taxes and fees ($800 LLC payments)

If you are an employer whose business has been affected by COVID-19, you may request an extension, in writing, of up to 60 days from the California Employment Development Department to file your state payroll reports and/or deposit payroll taxes without penalty or interest. This written request must be received within 60 days of the original delinquent date of payment or return.

Although the Ludmila CPA team are all working from home as we ride out the COVID-19 crisis safely, we want you to know that we are working. We’re available to assist you with filing returns, answering your questions, sharing financial advice, and providing peace of mind in this difficult time. Don’t hesitate to contact us with your questions or concerns.

A final word: If COVID-19 teaches us anything, it’s that nothing is more important than our health and well-being. Be present with your family, take care of yourself, and know that we’ll all get through this. Hang in there, and please let us know if we can help.

Filing Taxes During the Coronavirus | COVID-19 Update

We understand these are turbulent times for many people and it can be really scary. If you haven’t heard yet, to ease the burden of these times, the tax deadline has been extended to July 15 rather than April 15. We are currently out of office and are working from home. Even though we may not be able to help you face-to-face, there are still actions you can take to stay on top of filing your taxes during the coronavirus.

Here are some things you can do for filing your taxes during the coronavirus.

1. Get a scanner and scan all your tax documents. First of all, you will do yourself a favor and have a digital copy of all the documents. As long as you keep a good backup copy of your hard drive, no need to keep paper.

2. You can send your scanned documents to us using the secure file transfer at: https://ludmilacpa.leapfile.net. We scan all the documents we receive. If you do it for us, you should see some tax prep cost savings.

3. We conduct meetings over the phone and over the Zoom video chat. Industry experts say that virtual meetings are what the majority meetings will be in the future. Learn the new technology to keep up with technology.

4. Be pro-active and scan all your 2020 tax information. It will be helpful to you when the next tax season rolls around.

5. If you are not into all this technology yet, just put all your tax info into an envelope and mail it to: 930 Tahoe Blvd # 802-393 Incline Village, NV 89451.

We cannot wait to go back to normal business when we can be in the same office sharing a cup of coffee together. Until then, we will make it work to the best of our ability. And hopefully, everybody will learn something important that can be utilized in the future (either new technology or the new understanding how important it is for us, human, to be together). If you need help with filing your taxes during the coronavirus, please give us a call!

Tips for a Trouble-Free Tax Time

tax timeTax time ain’t what it used to be — and that’s a good thing! It used to be that you had to lug a box of documents (arduously collected over many months) into your accountant’s office and plan to spend a few excruciating hours poring over your receipts. Not so anymore! In these days of electronic filing, you really don’t even need to be present. At our offices, we can prepare your return quickly without needing to sit through meeting after meeting. We’re able to be far more efficient with our time (and your money) than ever before, and you’re able to get out and enjoy this unseasonably beautiful weather without giving it another thought.

The key is providing your information digitally (and securely) to your CPA or come by our office and drop it off with us. The information you’ll need to provide includes the following (not all may apply to you):

  • Your prior year’s tax return, if you are a new customer
  • Form W-2, if you worked for a company and even if the company is yours
  • Bank-provided Forms 1099-DIVS and INT — your dividend and interest income
  • Your investment portfolio Consolidated Form 1099, which would include all the sales of marketable securities
  • Form(s) 1099-R, if you are retired
  • Social security statement (also for retirees)
  • All Forms K-1, if you have invested in any companies (some may not arrive until sometime in September)
  • Form 1041, if you have been the beneficiary of a trust (if the trust did not make any distributions during the prior year, the form usually shows only zeros and is often not provided)
  • Forms 1099-MISC, if you are self-employed (Note: The IRS is really watching for under-reported income. Sometimes, these forms are issued with errors. We usually make corrections when filing your tax return. Also, bring the summary of your income and expenses.)
  • Forms 1099-MISC, if you are a real estate investor and have collected rent (as well as the schedule of expenses to offset that income, at least partially)
  • Form 1098-T for parents with students, allowing you to take a deduction for some of the tuition paid during the prior year (some parents with higher income will not be able to take advantage of this otherwise-generous tax credit)
  • Form 1098, the mortgage expense statement for homeowners
  • Detailed list of child care expenses, including tax ID of the institutions your child attended
  • Health Savings accounts contribution and distribution statements (Forms 5498-SA and 1099-SA)
  • A list of questions (The general rule is that it’s better to bring more than omit some very important information)
  • Any other documents which arrived in the envelope marked “Important Tax Information Enclosed”

Additionally, to help us make the decision about whether you should itemize or take the standard deduction, bring your real estate property tax paid, DMV registration fees, summary of charitable contributions (cash and non-cash separately) and summary of medical expenses (if they were significant: think “at least over $7,500 for taxpayers with AGI of $100,000).

Once you’ve assembled all this information, my advice is this: Schedule your appointment with us for AFTER tax season. Although we’re always happy to meet with any clients who would like to sit with us during tax preparation, it’s not an effective use of your time or ours. Instead, send the information in or drop it off personally, then give us a chance to prepare your return and get a clear understanding of your financial picture. Then we can speak about the return in person or by phone to go through it and, most importantly, schedule a meeting to plan the next year. This is the most important part of tax work — planning the next 12 months. This helps ensure that you’re achieving the financial goals you’ve set for yourself and can minimize tax risks for the coming year.

Are you convinced? The April 15 tax deadline is fast approaching, so contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss any concerns you may have. We’re ready to help you make tax time a lot less taxing.

Is Your Business Ready To Jump Into Tax Season?

tax seasonAs we approach April, the time of year that makes business owners shake in their boots and CPAs guzzle coffee by the gallon, take comfort in one small silver lining: It’s a leap year, so you get an extra day of preparation. Okay, well, I did say it was small…

As the turbulence of last year’s changes to the tax law has stabilized, we have a better handle on how best to adjust and hopefully started putting plans in motion last year that will pay off this year. Nonetheless, there are always a few changes, and keeping them straight can be tricky, so we’ve rounded up the following list of important business tax deadlines, so you can be as prepared as possible for tax season:

March 16:

  • S-Corps, partnerships, and multiple-member LLCs must file returns or extensions. Bear in mind that if you miss this deadline, even by just one day, you’ll be charged a monthly penalty of $195, which will be assessed every month you’re late, per owner. The charge is not prorated, so don’t miss that deadline.
  • File for an extension. If you don’t think you can make the deadline for S-Corps, partnerships, and LLCs to file, be safe and file an extension, which gives you until September 15, and you won’t have to pay that steep penalty. (C-Corps and other entities, see below for your deadline and extension information.) But it only works if you file for the extension by March 16. Business tax extensions are filed either electronically by tax preparers OR by mail using Form 7004. We prefer electronic filing, because we receive a record of acceptance from the IRS, which is not the case with paper forms (unless you use certified mail with return receipt, which would be your next best option).
  • Newly formed corporations must elect S status by today. By electing to become an S-Corp instead of a C-Corp, you’ll be converting a corporation from paying its own taxes to passing income to the owners or shareholders, thus avoiding double taxation during tax season. If you wish to change to S status, you must do so by March 16.

April 15: Tax Day

  • C-Corps, trusts, sole proprietorships, and single-member LLCs must file return. Sole proprietorships file their returns on their individual Schedule C forms by the standard filing date for individuals. This is also the date on which you’d need to file for an extension in order to avoid penalties. The extension would give you until October 15.
  • Single-owner LLCs and partnerships run by married couples are disregarded entities, which file Schedule C by April 15. In these cases, the businesses are not seen by the IRS as distinct from their owners, so they file their returns on their individual Schedule C forms by the standard filing date for individuals (April 15). NOTE: This only applies to LLCs organized in community property states, such as Nevada and California. In some states, LLCs owned by married couples may have to file separate tax returns, so be sure to speak with us about the rules in your state.
  • Pay California LLC fee of $800. If your business is located in California, your $800 LLC fee is due today. The fee is due even if your business is formed in a different state but is registered as a Foreign LLC or S Corporation in California.

May 15:

  • Private foundations must file Form 990-PF. This is the deadline for private foundations to figure their taxes based on investment income and to report charitable distributions and activities. Extension to file is available to be able to file by August 15.

September 15:

  • LLCs, Partnerships and S Corporations which have requested 6-months extension. This is the final deadline of the year. If the deadline is missed, the late filing penalty of $195 per owner will start accumulating starting back on April 15!

And if your fiscal year ends on a day other than December 31 … Your filing deadline is the 15th day of the third month AFTER the end of your fiscal year (the 15th of the fourth month for C Corporations). So if your fiscal year ends July 31 and you are an S Corporation, the return or extension is due by October 15.

And our most important tax advice? Don’t wait until your appointment with us to prepare your records during tax season! In order for us to be most effective with our time, and in order to work with you to forecast the next year and make informed recommendations, it’s important for you to give us access to all documents early, so that we can prepare your return in a timely fashion and our appointment can focus on planning, which we firmly believe is the most important service we can provide. And please don’t hesitate to contact us with questions or issues you’d like to discuss, no matter what time of year it is – not just during tax season.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss any deadlines or requirements that may pertain to your business. Happy tax season!

A New-Year Checklist for Financial Health

financial healthJanuary is always a great time to wipe the slate clean and start fresh, tackling long-overdue tasks and starting on the right foot. Even more ideal is that this year is 2020 — as in giving your finances some 20-20 vision to be real with yourself and find opportunities to improve your financial health.

So here’s my “2020 Vision” list of financial moves you should consider making this year. Even if you only tackle a few of them, you’re well on your way to a financially healthier, happier new year.

Make sure you have a living trust.
This applies particularly to adults who have children who are minors. Are they protected against disaster if something happens to you? In most cases, without a living trust, your estate will go through probate before plans are established for your offspring. But with a trust, your wishes are followed immediately, including any and all rules you’ve established in the trust (age at which beneficiaries receive assets, for example). With a trust, you can designate a guardian for your children, too. Having a will is an important first step in designating whom will receive your belongings, but without a trust, your estate still will go through probate, with or without a will. Although a CPA cannot prepare this legal document, a CPA can prepare or assist with the balance sheet you’ll need to organize your finances and help create a list of assets for the trust. The best-case scenario is to work with a CPA and attorney as a team in this process, and our firm is happy to recommend area attorneys who can assist you with this.

Address life insurance.
Your policy should pay out about five times your annual income per working parent. Even if your children are older, it’s still important to have life insurance if your kids are pre-college age and living at home, and if you have a mortgage. If you are still young, you’ll find that the rates for term life insurance are very affordable, perhaps only about $500 a year. We advise clients to explore leveled term insurance; with this type of policy, you can get a 10, 20, or 30-year term without a price increase. Although such a policy might be more expensive early on, it levels off, making it much easier to adapt to the payments. At our firm, we have seen cases both with and without life insurance, and I can tell you that it makes a huge difference for the survivors’ lives to have the safety net of such a policy. We are happy to refer you to professionals who can find the right plan for you.

Make sure you’re getting the most from your retirement plan.
It doesn’t matter how young you are, the time to start thinking about retirement is now. The earlier you start, the better the result. If you have a retirement plan at work, plan to contribute up to the maximum allowed. If you don’t have a plan at work, look into setting up a Roth or Traditional IRA. For self-employed individuals, it’s a good idea to contribute to self-employment IRAs. For Roth and Traditional IRAs, if you’re 49 or younger, the maximum amount you are allowed to contribute each year is $6,000; if you’re over 50, you can contribute $7,000. However, if you have a 401k plan and you’re 50 or older, you’re allowed to contribute $19,500 per year, starting in 2020. (Note that the IRS goes by the year you turn 50, not your birthday. So if you turn 50 this year in October, you’re still considered 50 in January.) If you’re self-employed, you can contribute 25% of your net income to a self-employment IRA; doing so decreases your taxes. In other words, if you earn $100,000 annually after deductions, you can put $25,000 away and it comes off your taxable income amount. But note: You will pay taxes later. With a Roth IRA, your contribution comes from taxed income, so you won’t pay taxes on that when you withdraw funds later. There are also income limits, so consult with us. We can refer you to an expert on retirement plans to find the right one for you.

Ensure your beneficiaries are up to date.
Having a trust, life insurance, and retirement accounts means you’ll need to decide whom should receive the benefits of these plans. And if your plans were set up long ago, it’s possible that your beneficiaries have changed — particularly if your family’s demographics have changed, such as with a divorce, a new child, etc. Make sure you take the time to review the beneficiaries listed on all plans and make all necessary updates for your financial health.

Establish a doable savings plan.
Strive to save 10% of your gross earnings. Invest in different kinds of assets for your financial health; don’t put everything in one basket. Put your saved earnings in different savings vehicles — money markets, stocks and bonds (with a variety of risk levels), real estate, retirement plans, and savings accounts. Make sure you have an emergency fund — according to Dave Ramsey, that should be at least $1,000 and up to six months of your earnings. Such a fund enables you to weather unexpected financial storms without disturbing your day-to-day finances.

Create a safe list of passwords.
I’ve unfortunately seen numerous cases in which loved ones couldn’t access important accounts left behind when relatives pass away, all because they couldn’t find the passwords. Take the time to make a list of login information for those important accounts and keep it in a safe deposit box or some other safe place where the people leave behind could access it, in the event of your death. Or tell your CPA to direct the family to this so they can find that information.

Be sure you know what electronic payments you’re making.
We believe electronic, automatic payments are a good, time-saving idea, but don’t let them run on autopilot without checking on them. The beginning of the year is a good time to evaluate everything you’re paying automatically, to make sure those payments should continue. You can automate your payments for telephone, Internet, mortgage, car payments, and more, and you can sometimes work with representatives to find ways to lower those payments. For example, perhaps you’re paying for a sports channel on satellite TV that you never watch — that could save you a nice chunk of change. You might even look at changing providers or negotiating your rates. You might even find that you’re paying a monthly subscription to a service you aren’t using, like a gym membership. Even little changes like that help your financial health.

And finally, now’s the time, before tax season really heats up, to set up your CPA appointment to get your financial health in order.

We wish you all the best for 2020, and we look forward to working with you!

Setting Up or Closing Up Shop?

It may seem like deciding to open or close your business is the hardest part of the process. In truth, though, you have some important accounting responsibilities to address, and if they’re not done right, the business could either start off on the wrong foot financially or continue to cause you prolonged stress long after you’ve closed it and ceased its operations.

Hanging Your Shingle?

Let’s start with opening your business. Picking out a name, designing a logo and a website, finding a location, and hiring staff are important, but you’ll also have to perform several steps to ensure that your finances are running smoothly. These include:

  1. Select a name for your business and, if necessary file a DBA form (Doing Business As) to begin using your fictitious firm name if it is different from the legal entity name.
  2. Will you operate as a sole proprietorship, an LLC, an S-Corp, or a C-Corp? Selecting your business’ entity and filing paperwork according is an important first step.
  3. Register your business with the Secretary of State.
  4. File tax information to obtain your business’ EIN Number (your federal tax ID number).
  5. File for state or county business licenses.
  6. Register your business with the Department of Taxation and State Unemployment Agency (if you plan to have employees).

Depending on the size and scope of your business, it can feel overwhelming to complete all these steps, and for much of the information you’ll be asked to provide, it can be helpful to have a financial expert who’s familiar with your business and goals to provide consistent, accurate information on all forms.

This is a journey we love to take with our clients. We can help you make decisions about your bank accounts, help you plan and scale your business’ growth, and set up accounting systems that you can maintain for the long haul.

This moment, the inception of your business, is crucial as it determines the course you’ll follow. Even small errors can compound and wind up costing you in the form of IRS and state agencies penalties, not to mention in terms of your reputation with employees and customers. We can help you establish efficiencies right from the start and help you eliminate errors that many new businesses owners make.

Shuttering a Business

The decision to close a business for any reason can be emotionally stressful as well as exhausting. It’s not as if you can simply hang a “Closed” sign and walk away — you still have miles to go before you sleep. And if you don’t follow the proper steps, the business you mean to close can end up becoming an albatross around your neck.

Though states can vary in their requirements, here’s a general breakdown of what needs to happen:

  1. The first thing to address is the money. You’ll need to close all bank accounts related to the business, especially if more than one person has access to those accounts. These include payroll accounts and tax accounts.
  2. After all shareholders or members have agreed to the dissolution, you’ll need to file a Certificate of Dissolution with the Secretary of State in any state where the company did business. It may be called Articles of Dissolution. Some states require that taxes be paid first. Without this paperwork, your business could go into default, which becomes public information and may affect your future business dealings. Note that some states, California as an example with its $800 minimum franchise tax, would expect you to pay for each year until you file that Certificate of Dissolution.
  3. If you haven’t already done this prior to filing your Certificate of Dissolution, you’ll need to file your business’ final tax return as well as your payroll returns, with both the IRS and, if necessary, the state, and they must be marked as final. Nevada doesn’t require income tax filings, but California does, and our firm frequently works with businesses from both states. Note that if these filings aren’t done promptly, it can have financial repercussions. Our firm has worked with clients in California who, for whatever reason, haven’t filed final payroll tax returns, and the state estimated the business wages for year after year, assessing taxes and sending bills that take months to resolve. And if business owners have changed addresses and not notified the California Franchise Tax Board, the agency can retrieve the assessed taxes from any business accounts it finds aren’t closed. Pay particular attention to payroll taxes and make sure no outstanding balances are owed; small business owners may be personally liable for those taxes, and liability protection won’t help in such matters.

As you can see, the steps involved in closing a business can be quite involved, and the stakes are high for getting them right the first time. Minimize the stress inherent in shuttering a business by hiring a certified public accountant (CPA) firm to do this right the first time and ensure as smooth a transition as possible.

Have you dotted all your I’s and crossed your T’s when it comes to establishing or dissolving your business? Contact ustoday and let us answer your questions.

Has Your Small Business Had its Midyear Checkup?

Has Your Small Business Had its Midyear Checkup?

It’s time to examine your business entity.

Now that the year is halfway over, with tax filings mostly behind you and systems (hopefully) in place, it’s a good time to reflect on the months that have passed. What’s working and what isn’t? What’s your plan for the rest of the year?

So many small business owners just run on autopilot, taking the path of least resistance and doing what they’ve been doing because it’s easier. But what if what you’ve been doing is putting you at risk or costing you money?

I recently read that about one quarter (24 percent) of consumers felt they had too many subscription services. The problem is that with all these subscriptions, money is silently draining out of our bank accounts, yet cancellation is often such a hassle that people will pay hundreds or even thousands of dollars for services they rarely use. In this case, the path of least resistance takes a considerable toll.

It’s possible that the legal entity you’ve selected for your business could take a toll on you as well. That’s why this is the ideal time to schedule a midyear legal checkup for your business, to take its pulse and determine whether the entity you’ve established is working for you.

Did you know, for example, that an LLC owner cannot be on the payroll? Surprisingly, about half of the business owners don’t know that. Not only can an LLC owner not be paid through a payroll service, but an LLC owner also cannot issue him/herself a W2. The IRS only allows LLC owners to take guaranteed payments — a rule that very few business owners are aware of.

Facts like this can make all the difference in how your business operates. Especially with the new tax laws that just went into effect last year, it’s even more important to choose the right entity for your business.

Small businesses usually can choose from among the following four types of business:

  • Sole proprietorship
  • LLC
  • S-Corp
  • C-Corp

Each one has its own rules pertaining to liability, tax burden, payroll, and more. There is no black-and-white, one-size-fits-all answer; each of these options has benefits and disadvantages, and depending on the type and size of your business and how it operates, one entity may be a better fit than the others. For example, an LLC often works better for a rental company or a holding business, whereas S-Corp is usually a better fit for restaurants. But the only way to really know what’s right for you is to talk through it with a knowledgeable CPA.

When you schedule this appointment with our firm, we’ll have you bring in just a few pieces of financial information. Then we’ll evaluate your business individually. We’ll consider your revenues, your number of employees, and your future plans, such as how long you plan to be in business and whether you plan to sell later. We’ll also look at how many fixed assets the business has — some companies are asset-heavy, with equipment and buildings, whereas others might only be a single person working on a computer. And we’ll consider your estate or succession plan for the future. We’ll talk through the payment expectations, liabilities, and personal factors; we’ll go through the benefits or disadvantages of employees (W2) and contractors (1099). And we’ll let you know how each choice of entity fits your business in light of the new tax laws.

Once we help you decide on a plan, we can process that paperwork right away and act as your registered agent so we can speak on your behalf with the IRS, taking that extra burden off your plate.

Come talk to us about how your business can start working harder for you.

Changes to Nevada State Commerce Tax Filing Requirements

This information came from the State of Nevada Department of Taxation and may require your immediate attention if you are a business owner in Nevada. (June 2019)

The filing requirement for Commerce Tax has been changed. If the Nevada gross revenue of your business from July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019 was $4,000,000 or less, your business is no longer required to file a Commerce Tax return and your Commerce Tax Account will be automatically closed, effective June 30, 2019. 

If the Nevada gross revenue for your business from July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019 was over $4,000,000, your business is still required to file a Commerce Tax return on or before August 14th, 2019. 

In the event your Nevada gross revenue exceeds the $4,000,000 threshold in a future year, it is your responsibility to file a return for the year. Failure to do so may result in the assessment of penalty and interest.

If you have already filed the return, please disregard this informational message.

For more information about Commerce Tax, including the change in filing requirements, please visit the State of Nevada Department of Taxation`s website.

From the Desk of Luda – On the State of NV removing the requirement to file NV Commerce return by small businesses… In my professional and personal life, I have highly respected people and organizations which are not afraid to acknowledge mistakes they’ve made. As some of you know, recently the State of NV announced that the businesses which receive less than $4M in gross proceeds a year are not required to file NV Commerce Tax returns any longer. And that includes the Commerce Tax returns due by August 15 of this year!

I believe it is a covert acknowledgment by the State of NV legislators that the initial scope of NV Commerce Returns filers had been overkill, wasting the government’s and taxpayers’ resources. This is great news for the small business owners and their accountants: everybody in NV has one less tax return to file. Maybe, the Use Tax Return should be next?

Declare Your Independence … from the Financial Details

Declare Your Independence … from the Financial Details

Do you smell that? That heavenly unmistakable aroma of charcoal grills, freshly cut grass and sunscreen mean summer is here. And with it comes the promise of freedom — of course, America’s freedom, which we’ll be celebrating this summer, but also freedom from the grind of school, the day-to-day routine, and those snow tires (fingers crossed).

Summer represents everything small business owners are seeking when they first start their businesses: the freedom to travel when they want, to be their own bosses, to do their work how they choose at any time they choose. If you want to spend your Tuesday fishing the Truckee River, lying on the beach at Sand Harbor or taking your kids to Disneyland, you’ve earned the right to do it. That’s the biggest perk of owning a business, right?

So why stare at a mound of paperwork and worry about how the billing, payroll, expense tracking, and tax reporting will happen if you hit the road?

Instead, here’s some advice: Close your eyes; breathe in that glorious air; envision your next summer adventure, and declare your independence from your books.

While you’re stocking up on sparklers and packing your picnic basket for Independence Day, celebrate your own freedom from the financial minutiae of running a business.

That’s exactly why we’re here.

The whole reason Ludmila CPA offers a full suite of small business solutions is to enable small business owners like you to focus on their passions, grow their businesses, and, yes, to enjoy the perks of self-employment. We want you to enjoy your summer! (After all, we waited long enough for it!)

As a business owner myself, it’s important that I be able to take the occasional day to be with my family or to travel. Every business owner should do that, but you can’t when a rapidly growing pile of paperwork is sitting in the corner, filling you with dread and anxiety.

You may think it’s a wise decision to save money and handle it all yourself, but trust me when I say the small investment you make in hiring a professional to take that burden off your plate will provide endless returns in the form of improved mental health, quality time with your family and friends, and even improved revenues now that you have more time to focus on your business.

A lot of programs out there these days advertise that you can “Do It Yourself!” But is that a benefit? Aren’t you busy enough? And wouldn’t you feel better-having professionals give it their undivided attention? If you’re not quite ready to turn over the reins completely, we understand. We can still recommend applications that could complement our services and make your life easier. You’ll still reap the rewards of efficiency, time, potential money savings, and the opportunity to catch errors or even fraud.

While you should be able to disconnect from your work sometimes, you might feel more comfortable knowing that our cloud applications for bookkeeping allow you to check in from wherever you are — whether that’s your backyard or Timbuktu — anytime you wish.

Our wide range of small business services includes:

Schedule a meeting today and talk to us about how we can help — we’re happy to customize a plan that enables you to hand over to us only those tasks you’re ready to let go.

Then go celebrate your freedom!

Filing Taxes Late? Start Here.

Filing Taxes Late? Start Here.

It’s a bit like that nightmare where you show up for class on the day of the final, and you realize you never came to class before now and you don’t know any of the stuff on the test.

You’ve missed the April 15 deadline to file your tax return. You feel like a deadbeat. You’re scared about the consequences and you feel like the only person in America who didn’t make the deadline.

Well, I’m here to tell you, you’re not. We see a lot of this at our office. People skulk in, their tails between their legs, embarrassed that they didn’t make the deadline and imagining outrageous consequences.

These aren’t criminals. They aren’t dishonest people. Many times, they’re simply afraid they can’t afford what they owe, so they wait until they can pull the money together.

Or they’re perfectionists who fall behind trying to get everything just right and miss the deadline. They’re late one year, then that snowballs into the next year, and then the next, and before they know it, they’re five years behind and too afraid to file because they think there’s no way to catch up. They’re terrified about drawing attention to themselves.

In fact, Forbes says that about 7 million Americans fail to file their income tax returns each year. You aren’t alone, and the good news is that it’s not as difficult as you might think to get back on track. But the worst thing you can do is nothing.

  1. Schedule a meeting. Send us an email or give us a call. No matter how bad you think it is or how embarrassed you feel, you should know that we’ve seen it all before and we’re not going to intimidate you or make you feel bad. Taking that first step to schedule an appointment will go a long way toward helping you to breathe easier. When you call us, we’ll let you know what to bring with you to get the process started. Don’t worry if you’re missing documents. After all, that might be the reason you were late. We have ways to find some of that information you may be missing.
  1. Expect to sign a power of attorney. Usually, this is the first step in the process. Signing over power of attorney to us enables us to do all the talking for you. That way we can get hold of information, update all the information the IRS needs, and speak with the necessary parties, all so you don’t have to. Plus, as experts, we know the right things to say and the right questions to ask.
  1. Plan to make a plan. At our meeting, we’ll formulate a plan to track down information, submit letters, file forms, and make payments. Don’t worry that you’ll have to pay everything at our meeting—if you owe something (which we won’t know until we meet with you), we can come up with a reasonable payment plan that works for you. The IRS realizes that something is better than nothing, so as long as you’re committed to making regular payments, you’re usually in good shape.

Throughout my experience as a CPA, one of the most rewarding things about my job has been working with clients who were so behind on their taxes that they thought they were beyond hope. This is because, after working with them and coming up with a plan to correct the situation, I’ve witnessed them gaining peace of mind. The transformation was almost physical.

At Ludmila CPA, we know being behind on your taxes can be scary and even emotional. It affects your quality of life. But we do care, and we’re in your corner. Contact us today, and let’s figure it out together.